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Bullying can take many forms. Specific examples could be:

Physical: pushing, kicking, hitting, pinching, and any other forms of violence.

Verbal: Name-calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, and making threats.

Emotional: Excluding, tormeting, ridicule, and humiliation.

Racial: Racial taunts, graffiti, and offensive gestures.

Sexual: Unwanted physical contact, abusive comments, and homophobic abuse. 

Online/cyber: Setting up 'hate websites', sending abusive text messages, emails, and abusing people via their mobile phones. 

How to beat the bullies

Bullies are not special, not strong, not tough. In fact they usually need to appear powerful because they secretly feel weak. They may be: jealous of other people; unhappy with themselves; insecure; bullied at home; afraid of being unpopular; unable to show their feelings.

Bullies often try to make it seem that the bullying is the victim's own fault. This is never true.

If you are being bullied, speak out and tell someone. It can be a friend, teacher or anyone you feel comfortable talking to. 

Explain what happened, how often, who did it, where is happened and whether anyone else saw it.

Act more confident - don't let the bully know you're afraid. 

If a person who bullies feels that they don't have any power over you, it takes the 'fun' out of it for them.

Don't fight back. It can make the situation worse and can get you into trouble. 

Further support

For more advice and support visit www.bullying.co.uk

Click here for more information on the Samaritans who provide help to people 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Community Trigger

Responding to and tackling anti-social behaviour and hate motivated incidents are a top priority for County Durham and Darlington. We have strong procedures which allow the police, council, housing providers, other organisations and communities to work in partnership with each other to tackle anti-social behaviour and hate incidents.

We want to make sure we get it right first time, but recognise that sometimes we don’t.

What is Community Trigger?

The community trigger gives victims and communities the right to expect action is taken where an ongoing problem has not been addressed. It helps us and you by making sure that no-one suffering the harmful effects of anti-social behaviour and hate crime falls through the net.  It will also ensure that all that can be done is being done. 

When can I use Community Trigger?

When you have reported three separate incidents relating to the same problem in the past six months to the Council, Police or your landlord, the problem persists because of no or inadequate response from agencies and you feel ignored by agencies.

OR
You reported one incident or crime motivated by hate (due to race, religion, disability, sexual orientation or transgender identity, age, sex, marriage/civil partnership and pregnancy or maternity) in the last six months The problem still persists because of no or inadequate response from agencies and you feel ignored by agencies.

OR
At least five people have made reports about the same problem in the past six months to the Council, Police or your landlord The problem persists because of no or inadequate response from agencies and the victims feels ignored by agencies.

Who can use Community Trigger?
Anyone can use the Community Trigger if their concern is about anti-social behaviour or a hate incident / crime and meets the criteria below.
OR
In any other situation, the local agencies may take into account the persistence, harm or potential harm caused by the anti-social behaviour or the adequacy of the response from agencies.

When is Community Trigger not appropriate?

If someone has reported Anti-Social Behaviour and received a service but the problems and the investigation are on-going; you will be asked to contact the agency you are working with to tell them what is happening.

If someone has reported Anti Social Behaviour and received a service but they are unhappy with the service received or action taken; you will be advised to submit a complaint under the agency’s complaints procedures.

How do I use the Community Trigger?

If you have reported Anti-Social Behaviour and you feel that the problem persists because of no or inadequate response from agencies and you feel ignored, tell us about it under the Community Trigger.

If you think that your issue or concern is relevant to the Community Trigger and meets the criteria please download and complete the attached PDF document and send by email to community.trigger@durham.police.uk